Latest News

SEIU Winter Newsletter

Check out our winter newsletter!

Jennifer Williamson visit

State Representative Jennifer Williamson will be joining us for SEIU's monthly meeting in Smith 296 at noon on January 20th.

Rep Williamson speaks on behalf of house district 36 (which encompasses the PSU campus) for her second two year term, serving this session on the Higher Education committee and Ways and Means (which works out the details on the budget).  In addition, she chairs the Ways and Means subcommittee on Public Safety.
 
She is an attorney and former employee of PSU and has been a strong ally to working people and SEIU.
 
We have extended an invitation to our campus allies, students and faculty, to join us for this conversation with our state representative and find out about what the coming legislative session has in store for us.
 
Don't miss it!
 
OUS Classification Study FAQs
  1. Why is this class study happening? Why are many of the old classifications being combined into one new Classification?
    For some years, union members have expressed concerns that the classification and compensation system is overly complex, does not create opportunities for upward advancement, and does not adequately compensate workers. In 2011 the union bargaining team proposed that OUS undertake a comprehensive study of its classification system. OUS agreed, and also agreed to study compensation levels. Please see the timeline of this process. One the goals for this process is to streamline the system and reduce the total number of classes. This means that some current classes will be folded into the same new class. Some workers, however, will see little change to their classification.
  2. How can we shape this process? What can I do to make sure that the new classification system is fair and works well for all classified staff, and for our students?
    Our contract gave us the right to comment on the proposed class specs. See for the compiled comments at http://www.seiu503.org/2014/12/higher-ed-workers-read-union-comments-on-draft-classifications/. While OUS management is not legally or contractually required to act on our suggestions, they will most likely incorporate some of our suggested revisions into the final class specs. 
  3. What is my new classification going to be?
    Current positions, and the workers in them, won’t be “allocated” (assigned) to a new classification until sometime in November 2015 to June 2016. After that, the union will bargain the pay rates for each classification. The new classifications and the pay assigned to them won’t actually become effective until January, 2018. Meanwhile, OUS has provided a preliminary mapping of current classifications to the proposed classifications. This document allows you to see what your new class might be, and you can view it here.
  4. If I get put into the wrong classification, is there anything I can do about it?
    Yes. Next year the union will bargain an appeal process for workers who feel they have been placed in the wrong classification. The appeal process will be similar to the reclassification process which has been in our contract for many years. By the way, workers who believe they are currently in the wrong class can still use the current process until they are allocated to one of the new classifications. One of the ways you can help ensure you are reclassed correctly is by making sure your job description is up to date. See instructions for doing this here.
  5. What am I going to get out of this? Am I going to be paid more or less as a result of this?
    At this point, it is too soon to say if most workers are going to wind up with higher pay as a result of all this. It is highly unlikely that anyone will be paid less. The new classification system is intended to create greater opportunities for upward advancement and a fairer compensation system. Working together, we can make sure that happens.
Keep Oregon Working

Billionaires and big corporate interests are pushing Bill Sizemore's ideas to the 2014 ballot to further threaten working people and middle-class families. Visit http://www.keeporegonworking.org/ to learn more about how you can help push back! Also like the Keep Oregon Working Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/keeporegonworking

 

 

 

Posted by:

Share: